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GALLERY NEWS

Call for Entries: The View Juried Landscape Competition

The View is a juried exhibition created by Rosewood Gallery as a showcase for Ohio artists presenting traditional or abstract views of landscape or land imagery, environmental themes and world issues.

Entries accepted through April 10, 2015. Click here for more information and entry form.

Call for Proposals: Rosewood Gallery 2016 Exhibition Season

For details and entry information, click here.

 

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Bill Franz, Dayton at Work and Play

March 9 – April 3

Reception: March 8, 2 – 4pm

Photographer Bill Franz, who lives and works in Dayton, exhibits his collection titled Dayton at Work and Play.

 

Artist Statement:

In retirement I have become a volunteer photographer, doing photo projects for the Humane Society and for other nonprofits. I have also taken on a project of my own. I am learning more about the area where I have lived for the past 35 years and photographing what I discover – sort of National Geographic comes to Dayton, Ohio.

Many of the photographs from this project have been donated to groups that promote the Dayton area. I also share photos directly with the public through a facebook page called “Dayton at Work and Play.”

As the facebook page increased in popularity, an interesting thing happened. Viewers started sharing their ideas on what I should photograph. Thanks to them I have gone to local places I didn’t know existed and I have met Dayton residents of all kinds – recent immigrants from Russia and Rwanda, Buddhist monks, poets, archaeologists, welders, and many more.

Some of those people are shown in this exhibit. The photos were taken in Dayton, but I hope they are of interest to those who live elsewhere. To me, my project isn’t really about Dayton. It’s about the fascinating people and places that surround all of us, if we just open ourselves up to new experiences.

Profits from the sale of these photos go to the Humane Society of Greater Dayton.

 

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

Several years ago I decided to learn more about the area where I have lived for the past 35 years, and to photograph what I discover – sort of National Geographic comes to Dayton. The project has taken me to local places I didn’t know existed and has led me to meet diverse Dayton residents. Some of those people appear in this exhibit.

These photos were taken in Dayton, but I have been pleased to learn that they are also of interest to those who live elsewhere. To me, my project isn’t really about Dayton. It’s about the fascinating people and places that surround all of us, if we just open ourselves up to new experiences.

What influences your work or your creative process?

I love the work of Lewis W. Hine who photographed thousands of men, women and children at work in the early years of the 20th century.  His most famous photos show the building of the Empire State Building.

I also find the work of Brazilian social documentary photographer Sebastiao Salgado inspiring. He has photographed people and endangered environments in over 100 countries. I love the emotional content he is able to put into a photo.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

In his book Working, Studs Terkel shows us that work is about a search for daily meaning as well as for daily bread. A photo of a person working, or doing any other ordinary daily activity, is a success if it hints at that search for daily meaning.

 

Nathan Heuer, Fallow Ground: Lost Vistas of the Free Market

March 9 – April 3

Reception: March 8, 2 – 4pm

Nathan Heuer’s series of watercolor and graphite drawings is largely concerned with the role of architecture in society as a symbol of cultural values and history.

Heuer holds an MFA in Drawing and a BFA in Traditional and Digital Illustration from Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, MI. Based in Indiana, PA, Heuer serves as Assistant Professor and Drawing Area Head at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

 

Artist Statement:

My work is largely concerned with the role of architecture in society as a symbol of cultural values and history. Architecture represents a significant investment of time, resources, and design knowledge, and while we celebrate this fact in the achievements of our celebrity architects, we are less apt to acknowledge the achievement inherent in our more utilitarian structures. The American landscape, in fact, is full of contemporary ruins of factories, hotels, schools, and other architecture that has fallen by the wayside in an aggressively consumerist society. Each of these abandoned structures forms the nucleus of a small narrative, often one of lost livelihoods, budgetary cuts, and dying industries.

I choose to decontextualize the subject of each drawing, removing the structure from its surroundings and isolating it on a white ground. This aesthetic decision is intended to echo the fragmentary picture of history that we are presented with in a museum, where isolated artifacts are meant to tell us the story of an unfamiliar culture. I use mechanical perspective as a means of meditating on the design process that went into the commonplace structures that I depict. Perspective is not only a visualization tool employed by architects, but it is also a process that helps me to fundamentally understand the space that I am depicting. It is my hope that through these drawings viewers will reconsider the deeper cultural significance of these structures and the ramifications of the intensive capitalism that shapes contemporary American life.

 

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

My process is heavily reliant on use of linear perspective, a system for accurately representing dimensional space that was developed during the Renaissance. This system, based on eye-level and distance from the subject, allows me to reconstruct architectural ruins from a variety of photographs and other means of documentation. It also allows me to act in sympathy with the often anonymous designer of the structures that I am depicting, because linear perspective has long been used by architects to envision their designs before actual construction. It is important to note that my drawings are not always exacting depictions of a particular site, but rather that they are sometimes liberally inventive in the interest of both the concept and aesthetic concerns.
What influences your work or your creative process?

As a native of Michigan, I observed and personally felt the social effects of industrial decline, watching friends and families members live in a state of chronic unemployment. These bouts of unemployment were often associated with the outsourcing of jobs, and though I was not familiar with the term late capitalism in my youth, I now understand its application to the world that I was observing. In short, late capitalism predicts the transition from an industrial to a service oriented economy, a transition that we are now seeing all too clearly. The ruins that I depict are records of this period of economic change.
What lessons have you learned from other artists?

This is a big category, so I will limit myself to two key influences. The German photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher have been inspirational in their development of a uniform system of documentation. Their photographs of blast furnaces, grain silos, and other industrial structures are presented from the same point-of-view and with the same lighting in grids, so that the minute differences between each are all the more apparent. From their work I learned the value of maintaining a necessary distance from the subject, as well as techniques for documentation. A second key influence is the painter Mark Tansey. While his work is very different from my own in appearance, I am a great admirer of his ability to explore complex historical themes with a very dry sense of humor.

 

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Sophia Maras, Delicate Issues

April 13 – May 8

Reception: April 12, 2 – 4pm

Possibilities1

Sophia Maras; “Possibilities;” 2013; wood, porcelain; 48 x 48 inches. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Found object sculptor Sophia Maras explores the use of recycled materials and common objects in a form of mixed media artwork. With this body of work, she hopes to create pieces that will challenge people to see a beauty in objects either over-used or over-looked. Maras gew up in Louisiana where she explored a multitude of creative avenues and developed a love for order and patterns in her daily activities, which she now applies to her artistic practice.

 

Artist Statement:

With this found-object-based body of work, I am striving to bring attention to the beauty in the used, neglected, or insignificant objects in our world. My work emphasizes the subtle aspects of these items by incorporating large numbers of them into a unifying whole. Arranging materials such as paper, screws, or plastic grocery sacks in a deliberate, yet unnatural order presents viewers with an opportunity to investigate. These juxtapositions are intended to pull individuals out of their normal realm of thought by giving them a different perspective on the material and perhaps the opportunity to see a new beauty in some of the minute building blocks of our daily lives.

I alter many of the materials through tedious processes such as weaving, wrapping, knotting, or stitching, which places a larger contextual gap between the final piece and the material’s original appearance or purpose. Drawing viewers in with structured arrangements of color or shape, allows me to intrigue from a distance. I am fascinated with the way in which multiples can transform as their numbers increase, thus giving the viewer a range of aesthetic experiences as the they move closer to the work.

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Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

The uniqueness of my process revolves around my time spent with the material. For some of my work, using methods such as weaving or stitching contribute a key aspect of tenderness to the work. Through repeating these steps several times, I try to meditate on the material and the process, connecting the items original purpose or form to what I hope my viewers will grasp from the final piece. This process results in a practice centered on time, focus and transformation.

What influences your work or your creative process?

The world. There are so many examples multiples around us every day. For years and years I have been amazed at the multitude of waste, recycling, and just plain ‘stuff’. Eventually, I began to transform those things into artwork: first in my mind, then in material. My purpose for this was to create something aesthetically pleasing, so that people could find a beauty in the items they see, use, and discard. Throughout my artistic development, I have discovered inspiring artists such as Vic Muniz and his work from the Wasteland documentary and Tara Donovan’s magnificent use of multiples in her installation work.

 

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

Production of artwork takes extreme dedication and hard work. Sometimes it can be too easy to stay in the sketching, brainstorming, or thinking stage of a piece. Regardless of life happening around you, it is so important to strictly dedicate time slots for artwork. Treating it in this structured way will force those creative juices to flourish and one’s practice to grow.

This is a hard lesson I have learned from a few artists over the last few years, and it is something I must keep working toward daily. As of recent, I was told to “just create.” No matter  hatit was, she told me to just make sure I was creating something.

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Landon Crowell, Constructed Landscapes

April 13 – May 8

Reception: April 12, 2 – 4pm

Landon Crowell; Island; 2012; wax, tar; 28 x 36 x 3 in.

Landon Crowell; “Island;” 2012; wax, tar; 28 x 36 x 3 in. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Mixed media sculptor Landon Crowell of Kettering will exhibit his collection titled Constructed Landscapes. Crowell holds a BFA in Sculpture from Wright State University. He currently holds positions as Adjunct Sculpture Instructor and Gallery Technician at Wright State University.

 

Artist Statement:

I have spent most of my life fascinated by the natural environment, taking odd jobs such as construction and factory work so I could spend my summers as a mountain guide in Yosemite national park, or the wilds of New Mexico. My “Constructed Landscape” series stems from those odd jobs, places I would explore, and even the airplane rides over the countryside getting to my adventure destinations.

In my “constructed Landscapes” series, I am working with basic construction materials: driveway sealer, plywood, construction chalk, hose clamps, wood, and adding natural materials such as bee’s wax and branches. This body of work is a series of mixed media low reliefs, sculptures, and installations based off of the natural world. Some imagery comes from aerial views, map-making symbols, and the landscape itself. This work deals with such themes as memory, landscape, and the interaction we as humans have with the natural world. The work is meant to be stark and in some cases even feel un-finished. This is to create an inner tension between the art work and the viewer. The inner tension is meant to relate to the tension between human kind and the spaces we alter in the landscapes we occupy.

 

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

I think my process is unique in that I am always pushing my materials in ways most people don’t think about. I use beeswax and driveway sealer together to create paintings and reliefs, and push the idea of basic construction materials slightly out of the world of construction and into ideas based off of landscapes. With very minimal alteration to the material itself, the materials come almost full circle. They come from the land and in a sense by turning them into landscapes, they return to a sense of their former state. I also am very conscience of the materials look and feel, I find the utmost beauty in that when I’m working.

I would say it defines my practice by having to be methodical, and sure of the direction I take with the materials, I Always keep in mind how the materials will shape or look when finished. I try to respect the material, and allow a symbiotic relationship to emerge between my direction and its inherent properties.

 

What influences your work or your creative process?

I would say the materials I use, my process and my love of the outdoors and the southwestern United States.

 

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

I would say one of the biggest lessons I have learned is that to let the materials speak on it’s own terms. If I have a piece of warped wood let that warp guide me, use the warp to my advantage, and make that warp a highlight of the work.

 

 

 

For more information, entry forms or exhibition proposal guidelines, please contact:

Tracy Flagg, Coordinator
Rosewood Gallery
2655 Olson Drive, Kettering, Ohio 45420
(937) 296-0294
tracy.flagg@ketteringoh.org