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GALLERY NEWS

Call for Entries: HWD (Height x Width x Depth) Juried Sculpture Competition

HWD is a juried exhibition celebrating three-dimensional artwork by artists from Ohio and the surrounding states. Established in 2007, HWD is the area’s only gallery exhibition devoted exclusively to sculpture.

Entries accepted through June 20, 2015. Click here for more information and entry form.

Call for Proposals: Rosewood Gallery 2016 Exhibition Season

For details and entry information, click here.

 

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Sophia Maras, Delicate Issues

April 13 – May 8

Reception: April 12, 2 – 4pm

Possibilities1

Sophia Maras; “Possibilities;” 2013; wood, porcelain; 48 x 48 in. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Found object sculptor Sophia Maras explores the use of recycled materials and common objects in a form of mixed media artwork. With this body of work, she hopes to create pieces that will challenge people to see a beauty in objects either over-used or over-looked. Maras gew up in Louisiana where she explored a multitude of creative avenues and developed a love for order and patterns in her daily activities, which she now applies to her artistic practice.

 

Artist Statement:

With this found-object-based body of work, I am striving to bring attention to the beauty in the used, neglected, or insignificant objects in our world. My work emphasizes the subtle aspects of these items by incorporating large numbers of them into a unifying whole. Arranging materials such as paper, screws, or plastic grocery sacks in a deliberate, yet unnatural order presents viewers with an opportunity to investigate. These juxtapositions are intended to pull individuals out of their normal realm of thought by giving them a different perspective on the material and perhaps the opportunity to see a new beauty in some of the minute building blocks of our daily lives.

I alter many of the materials through tedious processes such as weaving, wrapping, knotting, or stitching, which places a larger contextual gap between the final piece and the material’s original appearance or purpose. Drawing viewers in with structured arrangements of color or shape, allows me to intrigue from a distance. I am fascinated with the way in which multiples can transform as their numbers increase, thus giving the viewer a range of aesthetic experiences as the they move closer to the work.

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Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

The uniqueness of my process revolves around my time spent with the material. For some of my work, using methods such as weaving or stitching contribute a key aspect of tenderness to the work. Through repeating these steps several times, I try to meditate on the material and the process, connecting the items original purpose or form to what I hope my viewers will grasp from the final piece. This process results in a practice centered on time, focus and transformation.

What influences your work or your creative process?

The world. There are so many examples multiples around us every day. For years and years I have been amazed at the multitude of waste, recycling, and just plain ‘stuff’. Eventually, I began to transform those things into artwork: first in my mind, then in material. My purpose for this was to create something aesthetically pleasing, so that people could find a beauty in the items they see, use, and discard. Throughout my artistic development, I have discovered inspiring artists such as Vic Muniz and his work from the Wasteland documentary and Tara Donovan’s magnificent use of multiples in her installation work.

 

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

Production of artwork takes extreme dedication and hard work. Sometimes it can be too easy to stay in the sketching, brainstorming, or thinking stage of a piece. Regardless of life happening around you, it is so important to strictly dedicate time slots for artwork. Treating it in this structured way will force those creative juices to flourish and one’s practice to grow.

This is a hard lesson I have learned from a few artists over the last few years, and it is something I must keep working toward daily. As of recent, I was told to “just create.” No matter  hatit was, she told me to just make sure I was creating something.

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Landon Crowell, Constructed Landscapes

April 13 – May 8

Reception: April 12, 2 – 4pm

Landon Crowell; Island; 2012; wax, tar; 28 x 36 x 3 in.

Landon Crowell; “Island;” 2012; wax, tar; 28 x 36 x 3 in. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Mixed media sculptor Landon Crowell of Kettering will exhibit his collection titled Constructed Landscapes. Crowell holds a BFA in Sculpture from Wright State University. He currently holds positions as Adjunct Sculpture Instructor and Gallery Technician at Wright State University.

 

Artist Statement:

I have spent most of my life fascinated by the natural environment, taking odd jobs such as construction and factory work so I could spend my summers as a mountain guide in Yosemite national park, or the wilds of New Mexico. My “Constructed Landscape” series stems from those odd jobs, places I would explore, and even the airplane rides over the countryside getting to my adventure destinations.

In my “constructed Landscapes” series, I am working with basic construction materials: driveway sealer, plywood, construction chalk, hose clamps, wood, and adding natural materials such as bee’s wax and branches. This body of work is a series of mixed media low reliefs, sculptures, and installations based off of the natural world. Some imagery comes from aerial views, map-making symbols, and the landscape itself. This work deals with such themes as memory, landscape, and the interaction we as humans have with the natural world. The work is meant to be stark and in some cases even feel un-finished. This is to create an inner tension between the art work and the viewer. The inner tension is meant to relate to the tension between human kind and the spaces we alter in the landscapes we occupy.

 

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

I think my process is unique in that I am always pushing my materials in ways most people don’t think about. I use beeswax and driveway sealer together to create paintings and reliefs, and push the idea of basic construction materials slightly out of the world of construction and into ideas based off of landscapes. With very minimal alteration to the material itself, the materials come almost full circle. They come from the land and in a sense by turning them into landscapes, they return to a sense of their former state. I also am very conscience of the materials look and feel, I find the utmost beauty in that when I’m working.

I would say it defines my practice by having to be methodical, and sure of the direction I take with the materials, I Always keep in mind how the materials will shape or look when finished. I try to respect the material, and allow a symbiotic relationship to emerge between my direction and its inherent properties.

 

What influences your work or your creative process?

I would say the materials I use, my process and my love of the outdoors and the southwestern United States.

 

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

I would say one of the biggest lessons I have learned is that to let the materials speak on it’s own terms. If I have a piece of warped wood let that warp guide me, use the warp to my advantage, and make that warp a highlight of the work.

 

 

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

 

 

 

For more information, entry forms or exhibition proposal guidelines, please contact:

Tracy Flagg, Coordinator
Rosewood Gallery
2655 Olson Drive, Kettering, Ohio 45420
(937) 296-0294
tracy.flagg@ketteringoh.org